Consoling your child, consoling yourself

We decided to visit family in the big town. It was different. It was festive, heartening. Three days into the vacation and I wanted back. Don’t get me wrong, I love my family; it is always nice to hug your mom, have breakfast with your dad while still in night gown. It feels good to be with your siblings, while their offsprings brighten the day with their laughter and sparkle the house with sounds of delight.

Then there is the spending ‘quality’ time parked on the highway or perhaps trying to keep up with the cars that pass you by at astounding speeds.  In our mind, this scenario somehow does not equate to the gentle waves caressing the shores of the ocean. Many times, my wife and I had to call upon Vivaldi to resound our rhythm, however, mostly it felt like we were intimate with flight of the bumblebee!! I would imagine Rimsky had an alternative intention when he penciled the master piece.

Drive back was fun. As the sun set in the west and the sky spread out in the east, webbing her pink, purple and red net, the tears of pain at leaving the loved ones behind rolled down my sons cheeks. Part of me wanted to hug him tight and turn around, allowing him a few more days with family, but the father in me negated the emotion. This is the time to help them understand importance of cherishing the moments afforded to us, however brief they might be. So I did what in my humble opinion was right; I clinched my heart, let the tears gravitate, remained patient and prayed silently in my heart.

That night, hundreds of miles from either direction, I hugged him tight before going to bed, listened to his heart yearning, and reassured him that we will be together soon. Moments of sadness are always followed by happiness. With hardship, there is ease. With remembrance, there is peace. Then we prayed and slept peacefully.

You see, there are times in life when the urge to follow your heart is throbbing in your head, the desire to give in to your urges is oozing from your pores. This is when you must control your impulses, keeping in sight the overarching goals and examining your moral compass. It is at times like these that you should press on towards larger goals, leaving behind what appears to be seductive and enticing. Two more days with cousins would have been great, but the lesson to be learnt was of greater value. The lesson that it is okay to hurt, it is okay to cry, as long as you plan for another laughter, cherish the memories and work towards attaining them.

Sometimes, when solitude finds you and you can quieten your thoughts, I invite you to ponder upon the wisdom of these words I once read:

And he found you lost and guided you.

2 thoughts on “Consoling your child, consoling yourself”

  1. Very nice Fazal bhai. It is definitely something we can all relate to at one point or another in our lives. Keep it up.

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